India's premier luxury lifestyle women's magazine
Fashion
March 18, 2018

Day 4: Amazon India Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2018

Text by Sadaf Shaikh

Catch the best looks and hautest trends straight off the runway

Namrata Joshipura

The closing show by Namrata Joshipura comprised sharp silhouettes like gowns, jumpsuits and skirts in multiple layers of embroidery with a colour palette comprised electric blue, deep magenta, dusty pink, grey and black.

Péro

This season, Péro broke their age-old rule of a monochromatic Autumn/Winter collection with a pink and coral runway. Scottish tartans were revisited this season with resized, oversized and undersized blockings celebrating the label’s inherent traditional twists, weaves and grains. To complement their geometry of checks, Aneeth Arora experimented with checkered wool by superimposing printed florals on the fabric.

Sahil Aneja

Titled ‘Error’, Sahil Aneja’s Autumn/Winter 2018 collection was about more than a glitch or a mistake; it implied a break from the routine. This conflict resonated in the designer’s fabrics, colours and silhouettes with the 404: Error Not Found logo imprinted on casual t-shirts paired with slouchy jackets.

Nought One

Nought One by Abhishek Paatni took reference from a post-apocalyptic world where lifestyle clothing for the rehabilitated human race would be constructed out of leftover natural and man-made fabrics. The collection combined conventional fabrics like tweed and flannel in herringbone and plaid patterns with artificial fabrics like parachute and nylon for durability and longevity. Traditional kurtas and shawls were reinforced with heavy-duty tapes, rivets and D rings to withstand extreme climatic conditions.

Dhruv Vaish

Dhruv Vaish’s collection was a mix of skinny and boxy silhouettes which saw quilted jackets, bombers, long coats, sleek varsity jackets and straight cut pants toe the line between being traditional and youthful. The colours ranged from greys and chocolate browns to blacks highlighted with streaks of olive green while the fabrics included handwoven pure merino wool interspersed with windcheater material.

Siddartha Tytler

  • Aekatri by Charu Vij, AIFW, AIFWAW18, Amazon India Fashion Week, Amazon India Fashion Week Autumn Winter 2018, Autre by Gautam Gupta, Dhruv Vaish, Diksha Khanna, Fashion, Featured, Kanika Goyal Label, Menswear, Namrata Joshipura, Nought One, Online Exclusive, Pero, Pinnacle by Shruti Sancheti, Priyam Narayan, Rabani & Rakha, Sahil Aneja, Sahil Kochhar, Siddartha Tytler, Style, Womenswear
  • Aekatri by Charu Vij, AIFW, AIFWAW18, Amazon India Fashion Week, Amazon India Fashion Week Autumn Winter 2018, Autre by Gautam Gupta, Dhruv Vaish, Diksha Khanna, Fashion, Featured, Kanika Goyal Label, Menswear, Namrata Joshipura, Nought One, Online Exclusive, Pero, Pinnacle by Shruti Sancheti, Priyam Narayan, Rabani & Rakha, Sahil Aneja, Sahil Kochhar, Siddartha Tytler, Style, Womenswear, Neha Kapur
    Neha Kapur as showstopper for Siddhartha Tytler

Drawing inspiration from the 80’s era and Japanese rockstar warriors, Siddartha Tytler’s Fall/Winter’18 collection F.U.S.S was an amalgamation of pret and couture, street style and high street, comfort and luxury. Keeping the core aesthetic and the vibe constant, the collection made way for an edgy, experimental and sports-luxe collection. The collection was essentially Pret at its core but the techniques and surface ornamentation resonated with the couture line.

Rabani & Rakha

Rabani and Rakha’s collection comprised a wide range of styles and silhouettes from saris with frills and tassels to elaborate gowns and skirts. The showcased opened with an ash sage colour story with silver jewel tones and progressed into a metallic narrative that ended in royal navy blue.

Sahil Kochhar

Sahil Kochhar’s Autumn/Winter 2018 collection ‘Chitr’ drew inspiration from the colourful artworks of Ayumi Takahashi, a global artist whose work is greatly influenced by her life experiences and the people she meets. Takahashi’s graphic and whimsical approach was reflected by the dark colour palette which was offset by striking florals in mustard, bright red, beige and olive.

Pinnacle by Shruti Sancheti

Shruti Sancheti’s Autumn/Winter 2018 collection celebrated the muted refinement of a peasant’s simplicity juxtaposed against the majestic decadence of a Tsar’s palace. Layered styles were embroidered with traditional Eastern European cross-stitched patterns in an ode to the modern gypsy soul.

Priyam Narayan

Priyam Narayan’s label visualised the fusion of Indian Folk work, silhouettes with traditional motifs, cut works and crafts of the Middle East. Inspired by the Japanese philosophy of kintsugi, the collection celebrated simplicity with flowing silhouettes and intricate prints majorly running through all the ensembles.

Kanika Goyal Label

Kanika Goyal’s collection was inspired by Tacheism, a French art movement that abandoned the traditional style of painting and adapted spontaneous brushwork, drips and blobs of paint straight from the tube. This starting point led her to design ensembles with wayward strokes of paint against an already vivid colour palette.

Diksha Khanna

Diksha Khanna’s collection was composed of separates with unique design details such as cinched pinafores and frayed saris. Her philosophy of creating trans-seasonal clothing as opposed to demarcated summer and winter lines was evident from the amalgamation of easy breezy silhouettes and layers.

Autre by Gautam Gupta

Autre by Gautam Gupta’s ‘Metamorphosis’ presented a fabric that was crafted by the merging of Eri silk yarn and mulberry silk yarn. The hand-woven patterns were reminiscent of the French Art Deco with the looks comprising comfortable silhouettes such as trench coats, capes, jackets and dresses. Gupta dipped his brush into a colour palette of blue, violet, grey and white to do justice to his autumn/winter 2018 collection.

Aekatri by Charu Vij

Charu Vij’s collection comprised breezy dresses in autumnal tones like charcoal, rosewood and mustard which featured thread-based embroideries on luxe fabrics like Chanderi, cotton silk slub, wool and woven Chanderi. Most of the label’s pieces were presented as separates since Charu likes to give her clients the liberty to style clothes the way they’d like to.

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