India's premier luxury lifestyle women's magazine
Framed
September 16, 2016

View Siji Krishnan’s Versions of ‘The Family Portrait’

Text by Huzan Tata

The artist illustrates on canvas the many facets of human relationships for her latest solo show

(Click on any image to view in larger gallery.)

From listening to her grandmother’s stories to playing house with friends in her village, 32-year-old artist Siji Krishnan’s paintings are manifestations of several cherished childhood memories. In her new exhibition, The Family Portrait, the postgraduate from Hyderabad’s Sarojini Naidu School of Arts and Communication presents a series of artworks that portray groups of people — school students, conjugal families, circus troupes and even ‘freaks’ — who are related in some way. “Characters in these new creations are presented as though they are in old family portraits…. It is an account of the geographical and cultural background I belong to, and carries the flavours of my collective memories and experiences,” says Krishnan.

The South Indian artist, who primarily works with watercolour on rice paper, believes that her medium of choice gives her the freedom to create works that possess tactile qualities. “Sometimes I give a wash of tea or watercolour, sometimes I paste one more layer of thin rice paper to accentuate the frail quality of the surface. Everything depends on what I need at that moment in my work….” Ultimately, Krishnan’s paintings introspect on an individual’s complex network of relationships, and the personal and common ties that bind human beings to one another.

The Family Portrait is on display at Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke, Mumbai until October 29, 2016

Related posts from Verve:


Leave a Reply

Tweet
Share
Pin
Stumble
Recommended reading from VERVE:
hermes window, singapore, window display, fashion, art
A Window Full of Words

Dongdaemun Design Plaza
Explore the Beautifully Bizarre City of Seoul

Rashmi Varma, Swapnaa Tamhane, Prarthna Singh, Sar: The Essence of Indian Design
Viewing Indian Design Through A New Lens

Close