India's premier luxury lifestyle women's magazine
Men
July 14, 2015

Trend Report: 12 Menswear Brands for Spring Summer 2016

Text by Wyanet Vaz

The second coming of punk rock, Japanese influences and badass leather jackets make it big on international runways. Verve tells you what to ditch and what to die for…

While you may refer to any fabric with flowers as floral, when it comes to menswear, we prefer the usage of ‘botanical’ (we don’t want to scare the boys). After all, while gingham and retro did make the cut as spring-summer 2016 trends, it was these botanical prints that actually owned the runway. There was also the emergence of the alt-cool side, that approved Zen-like clothing and incomprehensible charms…not to mention the section that de-structured formal clothing, endorsed lace and re-invented daddy’s pinstripes.

Dior Homme


Orange was clearly the new black on Kris Van Assches assembly line. The collection begins with sharp suits and gradually moves to sporty jackets and camo prints, making you forget that there was once a formal moment.
Cutting edge: Orange lining ruled the collection as it appeared beneath coats, parkas and bomber jackets.
We love: The ceramic pagan-like talismans created by artist Kristin McKirdy.

Louis Vuitton


American sportswear met Japanese prints in Kim Jones’ collection for Louis Vuitton.
Cutting edge: Silk seemed to own the runway as bomber jackets and denims were crafted using this luxe fabric. Japanese motifs featuring cranes and birds-of-paradise have been beautifully imprinted on this indigo colour palette.
We love: The idea of silk denims paired with pristine white sneakers.

Gucci


Defining ‘young’ as a state of mind, Alessandro’s Michele’s collection for Gucci bordered on romantic chic, much like their signature vintage ensembles where the focus is always in the detailing.
Cutting edge: Lace shirts were teamed with intricate embroidery, bird motifs and flowers were layered over bombers and even the most masculine trench or suit was given a vintage filter.
We love: The blue biker jacket with studs and embroidery.

Salvatore Ferragamo


Geometric patterns and colour blocking techniques dominate Ferragamo’s collection. Bottle greens and various shades of tan work up a good assemblage of practical-wear.
Cutting edge: Stripes made a comeback on almost everything from bomber jackets to sweaters. However, unlike the varsity-like designs, this leaned towards boho and aimed at an older audience.
We love: The vulcanised sneakers and sandals that could be worn on eternal loop.

Burberry Prorsum


Christopher Bailey used the fine art of lace to give his collection a more breezy summer look. We were quite surprised to see an updated version of the classic trench that featured patches of lace.
Cutting edge: Silk T-shirts were paired with knit pants to give jogging-wear a more formalized and luxe appeal. The loose silhouettes caters to dandiness that comes with summer.
We love: The lace ties and shirts which were cleverly paired with sharp suits and jackets.

Alexander Wang


Rough, raw and deviant were the cornerstones of this collection. The luxed-up work-wear and sportswear was aimed at the bad boys, which certainly seemed to be Wang’s thang (if we may be permitted to twang).
Cutting edge: The moleskin-like fabrics in dull, dusty hues are for men who enjoy the lack of colour. Carpenter cloaks and feather-light nylon jackets make this a practical and fuss-free collection.
We love: The aviator bomber with a headphone loop so that your music is always under control.

Dries Van Noten


Dries’ punk wardrobe was everything Bruno Mars sang about in Uptown Funk. And for a moment one hoped that the line of models in suspenders and baggy trousers would start popping and locking.
Cutting edge: Much like Dali and Warhol, Dries Van Noten looked to pop icons for inspiration, printing the iconic Marilyn Monroe on shirts, jackets, short-shorts and even capes.
We love: The loose Marilyn Monroe-printed trousers, and hope to see them walking the streets.

Hermes


Véronique Nichanian’s collection for Hermes was directed at the cool kids. Printed scarves were teamed with shirtless blousons, and all one required was a spoonful of swag.
Cutting edge: Goat skin was the fabric of the day. It was imprinted using silk twill, reiterating the famous silk and skin combination.
We love: Hermes’ approval that everything can be paired with sandals.

J W Anderson


Samurai suits dominated the collection by J W Anderson. However, we liked the spiritually loose clothing and waist-bands that ran throughout.
Cutting edge: Multi-pleated pants were paired with leather jackets. Don’t miss the models carrying strange talismans.
We love: The Zen-like clothing that makes the idea of nirvana look cool.

Saint Laurent


Saint Laurent’s collection was titled ‘Surf Sound’ and gained inspiration from Californian surf music culture.
Cutting edge: We dig the tie-n-dye sweats, frayed hems and check shirts that totally remind us of the Hippie era.
We love: The Downtown, punk rock jackets and the cleverly paired white-rimmed shades.

Valentino


Made for men with a real wardrobe, this collection comprised of everything, however, all done differently. So you did have jackets, but they were made in two-tone, and there were chinos, but military-styled.
Cutting edge: If you believe that variety is indeed the spice of life, look to Valentino for comfort. From military to Hawaiian prints, denims to sophisticated olive jackets, this was an all-encompassing collection.
We love: The Hawaiian-print loafers.

Ermenegildo Zegna


This is one collection a modern-day Bruce Wayne would swear by. Even though the collection begins with an army of models in jet black, we like how eventually the colours progress to playful pastels.
Cutting edge: Drawstring linen-like trousers were teamed with gingham shirts and pastel jackets. We like the idea of deconstruction that breathed life into formal-wear.
We love: The pastel gingham oversized coats that are perfect for Friday dressing.

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