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Fashion
July 29, 2017

Day 5: FDCI India Couture Week 2017 With Varun Bahl And Monisha Jaising

Text by Sharmi Ghosh Dastidar

While Jaising’s ‘Opera’ focussed on sculpted gowns, lehenga-saris, cocktail dresses, Bahl’s collection was an ode to Czech artist Alphonse Mucha

Monisha Jaising

  • Monisha Jaising, India Couture Week, India Couture Week 2017, Designers, Fashion, Couture,
  • Monisha Jaising, India Couture Week, India Couture Week 2017, Designers, Fashion, Couture,
  • Monisha Jaising, India Couture Week, India Couture Week 2017, Designers, Fashion, Couture,

Monisha Jaising, who is popular for glamorous and sexy garments, presented a metallic extravaganza without the inventive flair of her contemporaries. ‘Opera’ showcased glitzy lean silhouettes and flouncy volumes but we wonder why the designer settled for the jaded gold and silver fabrics. Jaising’s collection focussed on sculpted gowns, lehenga-saris, cocktail dresses and pre-stitched saris. A handful of lehengas in Benarasi brocade added the Indian touch. Though immensely wearable, almost all the ensembles carried a ‘seen-before’ feel.

The high points presented themselves in the form of pretty maxi gowns stamped with Jaising’s signature element of fun and chic. Powder blue and green tinted, the floral prints and flowy drapes looked graceful. We give it to sassy showstopper Shilpa Shetty for salvaging a rather disjointed act with the red Benarasi gown.

Varun Bahl

  • Varun Bahl, India Couture Week, India Couture Week 2017, Designers, Fashion, Couture,
  • Varun Bahl, India Couture Week, India Couture Week 2017, Designers, Fashion, Couture,

Inspired by the works of Alphonse Mucha, Varun Bahl presented a series of vintage floral stories. Known for his dexterity in playing with embroideries and craftsmanship, the line showcased his innovative design aesthetic by using over-lapping surface ornamentation, intricate needlework and bold prints on soft buttery chiffon, silk, satins tulle and georgette.

Borrowing from Mucha’s masterpieces, the couturier blended a vintage idiom with modern execution playing with curved linear patterns, asymmetrical lines and floral and plant motifs. The colour palette relied on ivory, pale pink, peach, burnt orange, pistachio, red, and old rose, but in some ensembles, the hues failed to make a connect when clubbed together. Though wanting in restraint in some places, this assortment of lehengas, jacket anarkalis, saris and tailored couture pieces stood out for their structured and layered silhouettes.

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